ORC ID , Li-Min Rong PhD 2 ORC ID , Mang-Mang Li PhD 1 ORC ID ">
  • Users Online: 780
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 1785-1794

Dose optimization of intrathecal administration of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of subacute incomplete spinal cord injury


1 Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China
2 Department of Spine Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University; Guangdong Provincial Center for Engineering and Technology Research of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery; Guangdong Provincial Center for Quality Control of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China
3 Department of Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China

Correspondence Address:
Bin Liu
Department of Spine Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University; Guangdong Provincial Center for Engineering and Technology Research of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery; Guangdong Provincial Center for Quality Control of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province
China
Li-Min Rong
Department of Spine Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University; Guangdong Provincial Center for Engineering and Technology Research of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery; Guangdong Provincial Center for Quality Control of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province
China
Mang-Mang Li
Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province
China
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China, No. 2017YFA0105401 (to LMR), the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Nos. 31671420 and 81602482 (to MML) and a grant from the Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Bone and Joint Degeneration Diseases, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.332151

Rights and Permissions

Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are a promising candidate for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair owing to their advantages of low immunogenicity and easy accessibility over other MSC sources. However, modest clinical efficacy hampered the progression of these cells to clinical translation. This discrepancy may be due to many variables, such as cell source, timing of implantation, route of administration, and relevant efficacious cell dose, which are critical factors that affect the efficacy of treatment of patients with SCI. Previously, we have evaluated the safety and efficacy of 4 × 106 hUC-MSCs/kg in the treatment of subacute SCI by intrathecal implantation in rat models. To search for a more accurate dose range for clinical translation, we compared the effects of three different doses of hUC-MSCs – low (0.25 × 106 cells/kg), medium (1 × 106 cells/kg) and high (4 × 106 cells/kg) – on subacute SCI repair through an elaborate combination of behavioral analyses, anatomical analyses, magnetic resonance imaging-diffusion tensor imaging (MRI-DTI), biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) tracing, electrophysiology, and quantification of mRNA levels of ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. Our study demonstrated that the medium dose, but not the low dose, is as efficient as the high dose in producing the desired therapeutic outcomes. Furthermore, partial restoration of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor expression by the effective doses indicates that GABAA receptors are possible candidates for therapeutic targeting of dormant relay pathways in injured spinal cord. Overall, this study revealed that intrathecal implantation of 1 × 106 hUC-MSCs/kg is an alternative approach for treating subacute SCI.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed258    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded37    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal