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RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 1827-1832

Effects of targeted muscle reinnervation on spinal cord motor neurons in rats following tibial nerve transection


1 Department of Human Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Scinences, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; Department of Human Anatomy, Zhuhai Campus of Zunyi Medical University, Zhuhai, Guangdong Province, China
2 Department of Human Anatomy, Zhuhai Campus of Zunyi Medical University, Zhuhai, Guangdong Province, China
3 Department of Human Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Scinences, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China

Correspondence Address:
Lin Yang
Department of Human Anatomy, Zhuhai Campus of Zunyi Medical University, Zhuhai, Guangdong Province
China
Xue-Zheng Liu
Department of Human Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Scinences, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region
China
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Source of Support: The study was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Nos. 81760416, 81960419, 81927804 (all to LY), Science and Technology foundation of Guizhou Province, No. [2017]1226 (to LY), and Support Plan for High Level Talents in Guizhou High Education Institutions, No. KY[2018]056 (to LY), Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.332153

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Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to transfer residual peripheral nerves from amputated limbs to targeted muscles, which allows the target muscles to become sources of motor control information for function reconstruction. However, the effect of TMR on injured motor neurons is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of hind limb TMR surgery on injured motor neurons in the spinal cord of rats after tibial nerve transection. We found that the reduction in hind limb motor function and atrophy in mice caused by tibial nerve transection improved after TMR. TMR enhanced nerve regeneration by increasing the number of axons and myelin sheath thickness in the tibial nerve, increasing the number of anterior horn motor neurons, and increasing the number of choline acetyltransferase-positive cells and immunofluorescence intensity of synaptophysin in rat spinal cord. Our findings suggest that TMR may enable the reconnection of residual nerve fibers to target muscles, thus restoring hind limb motor function on the injured side.


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